Goats Road, Mechling Road, Leavitt Lane, Mohawk Valley Oregon Real Estate

Goats Road, and its two offshoots, J Mechling Road and Leavitt Lane are beautiful places to live in the scenic Mohawk Valley in Lane County, Oregon.  Hobby farms and country properties abound, and homes with acreage are popular, but not frequently on the market.  The Springfield Country Club is nearby on Sunderman and Marcola Roads, and some properties have Mohawk River frontage.  Mostly this area is a bedroom community to Eugene and Springfield, with both being only a few minutes away.

The Mohawk Valley is east northeast of Springfield and generally follows Marcola Road.  Goats Road bisects Sunderman Road 1/2 mile from Marcola Road.  Goats Road is about 1 1/4 miles long, and eventually dead ends.  Mechling Rd. and Leavitt Ln. are short offshoots from Goats Rd.  There are about 30 total properties on all three roads.  All three roads were named for owners that at one time held abutting property.  Information on the properties is below.

goats-road-graphic

Goats Road was developed first, with the oldest house dating to the 1920s.  J Mechling Road and Leavitt Lane were developed mostly in the last 20 years.  Property sizes range from under an acre to over 50, with 5 acres and under being especially common.  Values, according to the County, range from 144K to over 500K, so there’s quite a range. Sales data from RMLS, over the last 24 months, reveal 0 actives, 0 pendings and 4 solds; information was current at the time of this posting.  Prices ranged from about 160K to 460K.

Zoning designations common along the Goats Road area are:  RR5 and EFU.  The area is not within any UGB designation, so land development and building permits are controlled by Lane County.  The Goats Road area is in the Springfield School District, and schools are Yolanda, Briggs, and Thurston.  Much of the Goats Road area is within the 100 year flood plain so flood insurance may be necessary.

The Mohawk Valley, including the Goats Road area, is part of the Western Cascades.  Some 30 to 40 million years ago this area was ocean and the volcanoes to the east of the shoreline erupted ash and lava to form the Cascades.  The Mohawk Valley area is thought to be about 30 million years old  At several times, the land tilted upward and the ocean eventually retreated to its present location, about 60 miles west.  The area was glaciated in the Pleistocene era, from 2 million years ago, until about 11,000 years ago.

The Mohawk Valley, and probably all of Lane County, is thought to have been inhabited for about the last 10,000 years.  The aboriginal inhabitants fared poorly with the coming of European settlers, mostly because of disease.  Europeans had antibodies which the Native Americans did not, and disease decimated the Natives.  The few remaining natives in the Mohawk Valley were moved in 1856 to the Grand Ronde Reservation, which most of us know these days for the Spirit Mountain Casino.

When the Surveyor General’s office surveyed parts of Mohawk valley from 1853-1855 there were about 17 settlers in Mohawk valley.  Now, there are between 3 and 4 1/2 thousand people, depending which areas you include.  75% of those work in Eugene Springfield and the average travel time to work is under 1/2 hour.

For the early settlers subsistence farming was their primary activity.  It is hard to imagine living here without good roads, power, water and central heat, but they did it; it was no doubt a very difficult life.  One lumber mill was present in 1855, near where the Riverview Market on Marcola Road now stands, but logging and lumber milling didn’t become an economic force until decades later.  Without a good means of transport, the settlers didn’t have much use for lumber, other than to build houses and outbuildings for themselves.  Early settler’s cabins were typically under 400 square feet.

The Mohawk valley is about logging, which took off in the 1890s when SP purchased the O&C lands.  Logging remained strong until about the 1960s or 1970s, when most of the big timber was gone.  About 1/2 of the Mohawk River Valley is still in industrial forest, and the trees are on a 45 year rotation.  Logging continues to occur in the Mohawk Valley, and I still hear it up in the woods, but is by no means the economic driver that it once was.  When you fly overhead or look at an aerial map, it’s easy to tell the logging sites.  Cut-lines tend to be at right angles or follow ridge lines and they stand out.

The area in the Goats Road area was originally settled by two pioneering families a little after 1850, the Gullifords and Hardys.  All of the property on Goats Road, J Mechling Road, and Leavit Lane can be described as Township 16S, Range 2W, and sections 26 or 35.  This is where William Gulliford and Charles Hardy had their original homesteads, established between 1852 and 1855.  Both appear to have come to Oregon via the Oregon trail in 1852.  In 1859, William Gulliford’s son John Married Julia Ann Hardesty, showing folks did love thy neighbors back then.  The original settlers chose the best ground for farming and grazing because their livelihoods depended on it.  Farming and grazing exist to this day along the Goats Road area.

One of the original surveys from the 1800s showing the Hardesty and Gulliford homesteads.

One of the original surveys from the 1800s showing the Hardesty and Gulliford homesteads.  Added arrows point to the section numbers.

Goats Road, J Mechling Road and Leavitt Lane are beautiful spots to own real estate.  Buying or selling country property in Lane County can be a challenge, but a good realtor who is familiar with the area can be a great aid to you. If you are interested in real estate along Goats Road or other country properties in Lane County, Oregon, please contact me.  Or you can search listings here.

Yes, there are goats along Goats Road.

Yes, there are goats along Goats Road.

Cows and horses too.

Cows and horses too.

And barns as well.

And barns as well.  (c) by Robyn Hine, used with permission.

Pasture along Goats Road.

Pasture along Goats Road.

Old filbert orchard along Goats Road.

Old filbert orchard along Goats Road.

Sunrises are prettier in the country.

Sunrises are prettier in the country.  (c) Robyn Hine.  Used with permission.

Mechling Road sign, Lane County Oregon

Goats Road Street sign photo, Springfield, Lane County Oregon

Leavitt Lane sign photo, Springfield, Lane County Oregon

Donna Road, McGowan Creek Road, Springfield Oregon Country Real Estate

Donna and McGowan Creek Roads are two out of the way roads in the scenic Mohawk Valley in Lane County, Oregon.  Donna was formerly a town, but now only the road remains.  Donna and McGowan Creek Roads are still a pretty place to live, with short commutes to Eugene Springfield.  There are a few farms, but country properties are common, and homes with acreage are popular, but not frequently on the market.   Most of the properties are fairly typical of the Mohawk Valley, and in general quite scenic.

The Mohawk Valley is east northeast of Springfield and generally follows Marcola Road.  Donna and McGowan Roads are in the western side of the mid-Mohawk Valley.  Donna Road begins off of Hill Road, by the Mohawk General Store, about a block west of Marcola Road.  It loops back to Marcola Road after about 1 1/2 miles.  McGowan Creek Road starts from Donna Road and goes west, back up into the woods.  Only about the first mile is settled and it turns to forest land after that; there is essentially no settlement until you cross the mountains west and get near the town of Coburg.

There are about 60 properties with Donna Road as the address.  They range from 1/3 acre to 80 acres, with the average size being a little over 2 acres.  The County shows the value of properties along Donna Road from about 57K to 460K, with a median value of around 220K.  Property Sales data from RMLS over the last 24 months reveal:  0 actives, 0 pendings  and 1 sold.  Most houses along Donna Road were built gradually after 1910.  The oldest homes date back to 1910, and originally were company houses built by the Mohawk Lumber Company.  The old school house that was used from 1909 to 1963 still stands, but is now a private residence.  Interestingly, it cost $2,400 to build, and it’s worth over 100 times that now–who says real estate isn’t a good investment?.  House sizes range from 580 SF to 3,800 SF, with a median size of about 1,600 SF.  Median house value, according the County, is about $139/SF, at the time of this posting.

Of the 10 properties along McGowan Creek Road the County shows values from about 180K to over 320K, with a median value of around 230K.  Property Sales data from RMLS over the last 24 months show no actives, pendings or solds.  Most houses along McGowan Creek Road are newer, with an average age from the 1970s.  The oldest home dates back to 1915.  House sizes range from 1,450 SF to 2,560 SF, with a median size of about 1,980 SF.  Median house value, according the County, is about $117/SF, at the time of this posting.

Zoning designations common along Donna and McGowan Creek Roads are:  F1, F2, RR, and EFU.  Neither road is within any UGB designation, so land development and building permits are controlled by Lane County.  Donna and McGowan Creek Roads are in the Springfield School District, and schools are Yolanda, Briggs, and Thurston.  Wells and septic systems are the norm.

The area around Donna and McGowan Creek Roads was originally settled by two pioneering families before 1855:  The McGowans & Harleys, and many modern property deeds reference the McGowan or Harley Donation Land Claims, originally of 160 & 320 acres, respectively.  McGowan’s homestead was in the triangle, now formed by McGowan Creek and Donna Roads.  What is now Donna road also appears present in that survey.  The Harley homestead straddled Clark Brook; both homesteads were there at the time of the first survey in 1855.  There was an old road, first used by Native Americans, that connected the towns of Marcola, Coburg and Springfield, and Donna road appears to follow part of that alignment.  The first County Road, probably Marcola Road, was installed in 1887.

One of the original surveys near Donna Road, Lane County, Oregon showing the McGowan and Harley homesteads.

One of the original surveys near Donna Road, Lane County, Oregon showing the McGowan and Harley homesteads.

It’s hard to discuss Donna Road without going into the history of the former towns of Mohawk and Donna.  The town of Mohawk was the settlement around the old Mohawk post office, which in 1870 was located perhaps 3/4 of a mile or so north of the intersection of Hill and Donna Roads.  The post office was later moved closer to where the General Store is now and the town was renamed to Donna.  The town of Donna was a logging boom/bust town.

The lumber industry took off in the Mohawk Valley in 1896 when Southern Pacific bought the O&C Railroad lands in the area.  By about 1900, they extended the railroad through Donna, all the way to Wendling, allowing logs and lumber to be easily transported.  Before the railroad, logs were transported by teams of oxen or in Mohawk & McKenzie Rivers.

The Mohawk Lumber Company had a one-time thriving operation near Donna Road and had a flume from McGowan Creek to the rail siding at Donna.  The Mohawk Lumber Company also had its own short line near Donna for railroad logging.  This operated at least through the 1920s.  There was a train station on the main line, across the street, to the east, from where the General Store is now.

The Mohawk Lumber Co. in Donna was one of several large mills in the Mohawk valley, but all are gone now because the big timber is gone, and surface roads allow logs to easily be transported to centralized mills, farther away from the logging sites.  More than 90% of the original timber has been cut, and the land has been reforested.  Perhaps about 1/2 of the approximately 100,000 of timber in the Mohawk Watershed is 45 years or younger.

Seeing the serene houses and farms now along Donna and McGowan Roads it’s hard to imagine that it was formerly a bustling mill town with a railroad running through it.  Donna and McGowan Creek Roads have been slowly subdivided and built up over the years since the mills closed, with most of the building in the 1960s and 1970s.  It isn’t completely built-out, so further building and development is possible, although difficult, due to Lane County’s restrictive zoning ordinances.

Interesting or notable features along Donna and McGowan Creek Roads are:

  • The old Weyerhaeuser Railroad.  This was constructed around 1900 and ran through Donna to the town of Marcola, then to Wendling.  It was active until the 1980s.
  • The Mohawk General Store:  This is the former hub of the town of Donna.  The current building replace the store that burned in about 1913.
  • The Ping Yang School:  Destroyed in 1901, it was an early school, which had the notoriety of being dynamited several times, purportedly by surly neighbors.
  • The Emerald Empire Gun Club:  The shooting range up McGowan Creek.  You can sometimes hear gunfire from the club.
  • Logging roads up McGowan Creek:  If you like to drive through the woods, this is a great place to do it.  There are hundreds of miles of roads.
  • Allison & McGowan Creeks and Clark Brook:  You might find an occasional native cutthroat or rainbow trout in them.  They’re very pretty.  Some of the properties near them may have flood plain issues.

Donna and McGowan Creek Roads are beautiful spots to own real estate.  Buying or selling country property in Lane County can be a challenge, but a good realtor who is familiar with the area can be a great aid to you. If you are interested in real estate along Donna and McGowan Creek Roads or other country properties in Lane County, Oregon, please contact me.  Or you can search listings here.

Farm property and horse property are available on McGowan Creek Road and Donna Road.

Farm property and horse property are available along McGowan Creek Road and Donna Road.

Allison Creek, just past McGowan Creek Road.

Allison Creek, just past McGowan Creek Road.

Donna Road is associated with historical old schools.  Photo (c) Robyn Hine, used with permission.

Donna Road is associated with historical old schools. Photo (c) Robyn Hine, used with permission.

Trees remain, but the old ones aren't common any more.  Photo (c) Robyn Hine.  Used with permission.

Trees remain, but the old ones aren’t common any more. Photo (c) Robyn Hine. Used with permission.

Old tracks remind us of a bygone age.  (c) Robyn Hine.  Used with permission.

Old tracks remind us of a bygone age. (c) Robyn Hine. Used with permission.

Donna Road Sign.

Donna Road Sign.

Country roads abound.  (C) Robyn Hine.  Used with permission.

Country roads abound. (C) Robyn Hine. Used with permission.

Columnar basalt-dacite at McGowan Quarry

Old Mohawk Road Real Estate Lane County Oregon

View Map of listings

Old Mohawk Road is a beautiful loop in the scenic Mohawk Valley in Lane County, Oregon.  It is steeped in history, and relatives of the original pioneers still live there.  There are a few farms, but country properties are common, and homes with acreage are popular, but not frequently on the market.   Country properties with both river frontage and valley view are available along Old Mohawk Road.  One especially attractive aspect is that it’s less than 10 minutes to Springfield

The Mohawk Valley is east northeast of Springfield and generally follows Marcola Road through and past the town of Marcola.   Old Mohawk Road loops from Marcola Road, at the intersection with Camp Creek Road, then roughly follows the McKenzie River, and makes a sharp easterly turn before the Mohawk River, which it follows NNE, then returns to Marcola Road.  The length of Old Mohawk Road is about 3 1/4 miles.   Only about 38 properties exist on the Old Mohawk Road area, ranging from 1/3 acre to 90 acres, with parcels a little under 5 acres being the most common.

The County shows the value of properties along Old Mohawk Road from about 114K to over 495K, with a median value of around 240K.  Property Sales data from RMLS over the last 24 months reveal 3 actives, no pendings  and 2 solds.  Most houses along Old Mohawk road were built in the 1950s.  The oldest home dates back to 1910, according to the County.  House sizes range from 640 SF to 4,100 SF, with a median size of about 1,800 SF.  Median house value, according the County, is about $133/SF, at the time of this posting.

Zoning designations common along Old Mohawk Road are:  RR, and EFU.  Old Mohawk Road also has rare Rural Industrial, by the old mill.  It is not within any UGB designation, so land development and building permits are controlled by Lane County.  Old Mohawk Road is in the Springfield School District, and schools are Yolanda, Briggs, and Thurston.

The area around Old Mohawk Road was originally settled by five pioneering families in the mid 1800’s:  The Griffiths, Simmons, Staffords, Ramseys, and Spores.  The Mohawk Valley is indelibly linked to the Spores Family.  Jacob Spores was the third pioneer to live in Lane County, coming here in about 1847, and named the Mohawk Valley because it reminded him of the one in his native New York.  Jacob’s son James Madison Spores moved to Old Mohawk Road, and the homestead is still in the family, 5 or 6 generations later.  Two or three Spores’s children’s graves sit on private property by the BPA tower on the unnamed, but prominent, hill.    Old Mohawk Road has been has been slowly subdivided and built up since the pioneers, with most of the houses being built in the early 1950s.  It isn’t fully built-out, so further building and development is possible, although rare, due to Lane County’s restrictive zoning ordinances.

1855 survey showing Simmons & Ramsey homesteads.

1855 survey showing Simmons & Ramsey homesteads.

Interesting features along Old Mohawk Road are:

  • The McKenzie River:  To the west of Old Mohawk Road, the river runs NNW and the road runs NNE.  The McKenzie joins the Mohawk River about 1 mile away on McKenzie View Drive.
  • The Mohawk River:  Approximately 30 miles long.   The Mohawk has no dams on it and is flood prone after  heavy rains.  Areas along Old Mohawk Road can be prone to high water.
  • The old Weyerhaeuser Railroad.  This was constructed around 1900 and ran to the town of Marcola.  It was active until the 1980s.

Old Mohawk Road is a beautiful spot to own real estate.  Buying or selling country property in Lane County can be a challenge, but a good realtor who is familiar with the area can be a great aid to you. If you are interested in real estate along Old Mohawk Road or other country properties in Lane County, Oregon, please contact me.  Or you can search listings here.

Rustic barn along Old Mohawk Road

Rustic barn along Old Mohawk Road.

The Mohawk River taken from Old Mohawk Road

The Mohawk River taken from Old Mohawk Road.

Rush hour traffic in the Mohawk Valley.  Corner of Old Mohawk, Marcola and Camp Creek Roads.

Rush hour traffic in the Mohawk Valley. Corner of Old Mohawk, Marcola and Camp Creek Roads.

Mohawk River Valley view.

Mohawk River Valley view.

One of the old mill buildings.

One of the old mill buildings.

Picturesque Old Mohawk River Road

Picturesque Old Mohawk River Road.

Cool looking utility poles along Old Mohawk Road.

Cool looking utility poles along Old Mohawk Road.

Where Old Mohawk Road turns to follow the Mohawk River.

Where Old Mohawk Road turns to follow the Mohawk River.

Where Old Mohawk meets Marcola Road.

Where Old Mohawk meets Marcola Road.

Sunderman Road, Lane County Oregon, Real Estate

Sunderman Road is a beautiful little loop in the scenic Mohawk Valley in Lane County, Oregon.  It’s quite private, and country properties abound; while homes with acreage are popular, they are not frequently on the market.  The Springfield Country Club borders Sunderman Road in places, and golf course view real estate is available.  Country properties with both river frontage and valley view are also present along Sunderman Road.  One especially attractive aspect is that it’s only 10 minutes to Springfield

The Mohawk Valley is east northeast of Springfield and generally follows Marcola Road through and past the town of Marcola.  Sunderman Road loops from Marcola Road, past Old Mohawk Road, and adjacent to the Country Club, and returns back to Marcola Road after about 2 1/2 miles.  As Sunderman crosses Marcola Road it changes name to Hill Road.  Only about 130 properties exist on the Sunderman Road area, ranging from 1/3 acre to 46 acres, excluding the country club, with 5 acre parcels being the most common.  Some 40 properties aren’t developed, so it’s still possible to build your dream home along Sunderman Road.

The County shows the value of properties along Sunderman Road from about 99K to over 517K, with a median value of around 241K.  Property Sales data from RMLS over the last 24 months reveal 0 actives, no pendings  and 2 solds.  Most houses along Sunderman road were built in the 1970s.  The oldest home dates back to 1890, according to the County.  House sizes range from 800 SF to 5,800 SF, with a median size of 1,900 SF.  Median house value, according the County, is about $125/SF, at the time of this posting.

Zoning designations common along Sunderman Road are:  RR5, RR10, F2 and EFU.  It is not within any UGB designation, so land development and building permits are controlled by Lane County.  Sunderman Road is in the Springfield School District, and schools are Yolanda, Briggs, and Thurston.

The area around Sunderman Road was originally settled by seven pioneering families in the mid 1800’s:  The Scotts, Washburns, McGowans, Ramseys, Hardistys, Gullifords and Staffords.  Gulliford and Stafford family members are buried in the pioneer cemetery near Sunderman Road.  The Staffords came out West along the Oregon Trail in 1852, seven years before Oregon’s statehood.  Sunderman Road has been has been slowly subdivided and built up since the pioneers, but isn’t fully built-out.  Further building and development is possible, although rare, due to Lane County’s restrictive zoning ordinances.

Interesting features along Sunderman Road are:

  • The Springfield Country Club:  A beautiful, affordable, 68 acre, 18 hole golf course, originally formed in the 1950s.
  • Mohawk Elementary School:  A 12 acre, little country school.  The school was opened in 1964 and closed in 2011.
  • The Mohawk River:  Approximately 30 miles long.  It joins the McKenzie River along McKenzie View Drive.  The Mohawk has no dams on it and is flood prone during  heavy rains.  Areas between Goats Road and Tree Farm road are especially prone to high water.
  • McGowan Creek:  Named after one of the pioneers who settled the Mohawk Valley.  It crosses underneath Sunderman Road near the intersection of Hill, Marcola and Sunderman Roads.
  • Stafford Pioneer Cemetery:  The final resting place of some of the Mohawk Valley’s pioneers and their descendents.
  • The Mohawk General Store:  Actually at the intersection of Donna and Hill Roads, across the street from Sunderman Road, the store was a community hub and hotspot in the early 1900’s, and the old dance hall upstairs is still there.  It is currently a small community market.

Branch Roads off Sunderman Road:

  • Goats Road
  • Tree Farm Road
  • Keller Lane
  • Edgehill Road

Sunderman Road is a beautiful spot to own real estate.  Buying or selling country property in Lane County can be a challenge, but a good realtor who is familiar with the area can be a great aid to you. If you are interested in real estate along Sunderman Road or other country properties in Lane County, Oregon, please contact me.  Or you can search listings here.

Sunderman Road, Feb '13

Sunderman Road, Feb ’13

Mohawk River, from Sunderman Road

Mohawk River, from Sunderman Road

Mohawk River

Mohawk River

Mohawk Elementary School

Mohawk Elementary School

Cool looking barn off Sunderman Road

Cool looking barn off Sunderman Road

Greens at Springfield Country Club

Greens at Springfield Country Club

Golfing in January

Golfing in January.

Springfield Country Club Greens & Mountain views.

Springfield Country Club Greens & Mountain views.

Clubhouse at Springfield Country Club

Clubhouse at Springfield Country Club.

Corner of Sunderman and Marcola Roads

Corner of Sunderman and Marcola Roads

McGowan Creek just after it passes under Sunderman Road.

McGowan Creek just after it passes under Sunderman Road.

Country Property in the Mohawk Valley Oregon

This nice country home in the Mohawk Valley features solar power.

This nice country home in the Mohawk Valley features solar power.

This nice listing of mine is in the Mohawk Valley, Oregon, and it recently sold.  For those of you who haven’t been out there, the Mohawk Valley runs north east of Springfield to and beyond the little town of Marcola.  It’s picturesque and relaxed.

The house is on 3 acres, is clean and pristine, and has neat stuff associated with country property, like a chicken coop, a pasture, a shop , a woodshed and a greenhouse.  It also has solar power, which is a feature you don’t often see around here.  It’s also close to town, keeping those commute times and gas dollars low.

It’s RMLS # 12401459, located at 90470 Marcola Road, Springfield, Oregon.  It was reasonably priced and sold quickly.  If you’d like more information, on other country properties, please contact me.

Oregon Solar Power

Solar powered generation of electricity seems to make a lot of sense.  After all, sunshine is free and isn’t going away anytime soon.  Converting that extra sunlight to electricity seems much better than burning coal, gas, oil or uranium, at least to me.

Oregon is one of the leading states for the manufacture of solar panels and components.  The Solarworld Portland site has the largest capacity of any facility in the U.S., although recently they’ve laid off workers due to competition from China.  Sanyo’s manufacturing facility in Salem is another large producer of solar components.  Bend’s PV Powered (Advanced Energy Co.) also produces  solar components.  And, there’s even been talk, from time to time, of turning Eugene’s old Hynix chip foundry into a solar producer, although this hasn’t come to fruition.

With our oft cloudy weather, the Willamette Valley isn’t the first place that jumps to mind for solar power generation.  However, it’s more feasible than you think.  We’re apparently capable of generating solar electricity on the order of 4 kWh/m2 per day, which isn’t too bad.  Photovoltaics (PV) are the most common method of producing electricity, at least on a small, end-user application.  These use solar cells which give off DC that is then changed (inverted) to AC that powers the home.  When the sun is out PV does it’s thing and produces electricity, which is slick.

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Solar panels in Mohawk Valley Oregon

So, why aren’t there solar cells on every house?  Cost is probably the biggest factor.  Often a rather large initial investment is required, although this is frequently offset by tax credits, and other programs.  There can be long payback periods for the investment, and this is a deterrent to some.  However, solar power does increases the value of a home.

How does it work in the real world?  Pretty well.  This is a PV array located in the Mohawk Valley, Oregon.  It provides about 85% of the annual electricity for the household.  I, for one, would like to have my electricity bills produced by 85%.

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Residential solar power wiring in Oregon