Parsons Creek Road, Mohawk Valley Oregon, Real Estate

Parsons Creek Road, and its many offshoots, including: Pioch Ln., Rose Rd., Pentilla Rd., Regal Ln., Jones Acres Rd., Trestle Dr., Boiler Creek Rd., and Ewing Rd., are beautiful places to live in the scenic Mohawk Valley in Lane County, Oregon.  The area has a secluded feel to it, and reminds me of Lane County from days gone by.  Country properties are interspersed with timber properties and the area seems like you are up in the woods.

The Mohawk Valley is east northeast of Springfield and generally follows Marcola Road.  Parsons Creek Road starts from Marcola Road, less than a mile from the town of Marcola, which is about 10 miles from Springfield.  Parsons Creek Road is about 3 miles long, and eventually turns into logging road to the west.  Parsons Creek Road and its offshoot roads, which I’m considering the Parsons Creek Road area, comprise an area of some 1,500 acres, lending to its enclave feel.  There are around 375 properties with undeveloped timber property comprising more than half of the total.  Parsons Creek was named after Richard Henry Parsons.  He came to Oregon in 1853, and is known for establishing the Marcola post office and other civic works.

Houses in the Parsons Creek area date from 1900 with most of the development occurring after 1970.  Developed property sizes range from under an acre to over 15 acres, with 4 acres and under being especially common.  Undeveloped timber property is as large as 640 acres, a whole section or 1 mile by 1 mile, but small wood lots, under 5 acres are surprisingly common.  Property information is below.

Parsons Creek Real Estate Information, Lane County Oregon, Graphic

Developed property values, according to the County, range from minimal to over 680K, so there’s quite a range. Sales data from RMLS, over the last 24 months, reveal 1 active, 0 pendings and 4 solds; information was current at the time of this posting.  Prices ranged from about 130K to 475K.

Zoning designations common along the Parsons Creek Road area are:  RR, F, and EFU.  The area is not within any UGB designation, so land development and building permits are controlled by Lane County.  The Parsons Creek Road area is in the Mohawk School District, and schools are Marcola and Mohawk.  Not much of the Parsons Creek Road area is within the 100 year flood plain.  Wells and septic tanks are the norm in the Parsons Creek area.

Many would like to take an undeveloped piece of timber property and turn it into their dream country estate.  This is possible, but can be difficult.  Underlying forestry zoning, especially F2, can be a good candidate for this.  There are County rules for the development process, but if the ground is poor for growing trees, or if there’s substantial neighboring development, or if the property is a long standing legal lot, then the development chances are increased.  Land that is zoned EFU has a different development path, and showing a plan for annual crop income may help for this method of development.  A safer bet is buying an existing house or mobile home cheaply, then turning this into your dream home.  Development of country property is, unfortunately, its own esoteric and arcane field and there are experts that do nothing but this in Lane County.

The Parsons Creek area was settled after the rest of the Mohawk Valley.  Not until the1880s did Parsons Creek get any settlement.  For the early pioneers subsistence farming was their primary activity, and beginning in about 1850 they chose arable bottom land in the Mohawk Valley, rather than the heavily wooded, upland areas, like Parsons Creek.  From the 1890s onward, the timber industry made tree growing land much more valuable, and interest in it picked up.

Settlement and development of the Parsons Creek area was initially due to logging and lumber.  The Fischer mill had a camp for its workers on Parsons Creek, and in the 1920s there was a mill located near the creek mouth.  An overhead flume ran from Parsons Creek to the Town of Marcola from 1906 until 1916Railroads were also used to get the logs out of the woods, down to the mill in Marcola.  The Fischer Mill in Marcola remained the major economic force in the area until 1956 when it was liquidated; it no longer was economically viable without the nearby source of big timber.

Parsons Creek is a major tributary to the Mohawk River.  It is fish bearing most of its length with native cutthroat trout.  Tributaries to Parsons Creek include Whiskey, Drake, Wendy and Small Creeks.  The Parsons Creek watershed is said be less flashy (flood prone) than other Creeks in the Mohawk Valley.

Parsons Creek Road, Pioch Ln., Rose Rd., Pentilla Rd., Regal Ln., Jones Acres Rd., Trestle Dr., Boiler Creek Rd., and Ewing Rd. are beautiful spots to own real estate.  Buying or selling country property in Lane County can be a challenge, but a good realtor who is familiar with the area can be a great aid to you. If you are interested in real estate along Parsons Creek Road or other country properties in Lane County, Oregon, please contact me.  Or you can search listings here.

The actual Parsons Creek

The actual Parsons Creek.

I like old barns.

I like old barns.

There is no shortage of old agricultural buildings in the Mohawk Valley.

There is no shortage of old agricultural buildings in the Mohawk Valley.

Cows and barns go together.

Cows and barns go together.

EPUD substation.

EPUD substation.

The start of Parsons Creek Road.

The start of Parsons Creek Road.

Pioch Lane, Mohawk Valley, Lane County Oregon

Boiler Creek, Mohawk Valley, Lane County Oregon

Tree Farm Road, La Lone Road, Springfield, Lane County, Oregon Real Estate

Tree Farm Road, and its branch La Lone Road are private and peaceful places to live in the scenic Mohawk Valley in Lane County, Oregon.  Hobby farms and country properties are common, but not frequently on the market.  Tree Farm and La Lone Roads are at the eastern edge of the Mohawk River Valley flatlands, and trees are your only neighbors to the northeast.  The area is still close to Eugene and Springfield, with both being only a few minutes away, making for a quick commute.

The Mohawk Valley is east northeast of Springfield and generally follows Marcola Road.  Tree Farm Road takes off from Sunderman Road about midway down its length.  Tree Farm Road actually runs all the way to Camp Creek Road, but a gate is encountered after a mile or two, effectively stopping it.  Similarly for La Lone, it runs to Marcola, via Honeybee Lane, but a gate is encountered pretty quickly.  Sometimes these gates are open during fall hunting season, allowing for passage through the private timber lands, but most often they’re closed.  There are a little over 30 total properties on both roads.  Information on the properties is below.

Real Estate information for Tree Farm and La Lone Roads.

Real Estate information for Tree Farm and La Lone Roads.

Tree Farm Road was developed first, with the oldest house dating to the 1935.  No new houses have been built since the 1960s.  La Loan Road development dates back to the 1960s and development has continued until recently.  Property sizes range from under an acre to a little under 10 acres, with around 5 acres and under being especially common.  Values, according to the County, range from about 120K to 3900K.  Sales data from RMLS, over the last 24 months, reveal no actives, pendings or solds; information was current at the time of this posting.

Zoning designations common along the Tree Farm Road area are:  RR10, F2 and EFU.  The area is not within any urban growth boundry, so land development and building permits are controlled by Lane County.  The Tree Farm Road area is in the Springfield School District, and schools are Yolanda, Briggs, and Thurston.  Some, but not much, of the Tree Farm Road area is within the flood plain.  A few of the properties have had their water and/or mineral rights reserved from transactions having occurred in the 1890s.

Location of original settlers in the 1800s.

Location of original settlers in the 1800s.

The area in the Tree Farm Road area was originally settled by two pioneering families a little after 1850, the Gullifords and Hardys.  These families established their original homesteads here, between 1852 and 1855.  Both appear to have come to Oregon via the Oregon trail in 1852.  The original settlers chose the best ground for farming and grazing because their livelihoods depended on it.  Farming and grazing exist to this day along the Tree Farm Road area.

Tree Farm and La Lone Roads are beautiful spots to own real estate.  Buying or selling country property in Lane County can be a challenge, but a good realtor who is familiar with the area can be a great aid to you. If you are interested in real estate along Tree Farm Road or other country properties in Lane County, Oregon, please contact me.  Or you can search listings here.

Pastoral views are common along Tree Farm Road.

Pastoral views are common along Tree Farm Road.

I like old barn photos.

I like old barn photos.

The BPA lines cut through here.

The BPA lines cut through here.

A few signs of logging are still present.

A few signs of logging are still present.

Kelly Creek

Kelly Creek.

(c) Robyn Hine.  Used with permission.

(c) Robyn Hine. Used with permission.

Tree property can be turned into vineyards, if you know what you're doing.  (c)  Robyn Hine.  Used with permission.

Tree property can be turned into vineyards, if you know what you’re doing. (c) Robyn Hine. Used with permission.

Things are more serene in the country.  (c) Robyn Hine.  Used with permission.

Things are more serene in the country. (c) Robyn Hine. Used with permission.

The prettiest road are often gated.

The prettiest roads are often gated.

Tree Farm Road sign.

Tree Farm Road sign.

tree farm road sign, lane county oregon

Foreclosures in Eugene Springfield and Oregon

Where are the best places to buy foreclosures?  Not Eugene or Portland.  A recent article in CNN Money ranked the best places, which had a large supply of foreclosures, often between 3 and 8 years’ worth.  The Oregonian said Portland was not a good area to buy foreclosures, with a low supply of homes, said by them to be 9 months.  The overall rate of foreclosures is declining in Oregon.  When I looked at RMLS for the last month in greater Eugene Springfield, I saw:  24 active foreclosures, 27 pendings and 14 sold foreclosures.  If we’re consuming 14 foreclosures a month, then we have under a 2 month supply, which is not much, and a very strong sellers’ market.  If you have questions about foreclosures in Eugene Springfield, I have answers; please contact me.

Low Interest Rates: Good Time to Buy

Mortgage interest rates are very low these days, usually in the 3% to 4% range, which makes for affordable house payments.  Rates are said to be at 40 year lows, and combined with low, but increasing, house prices in Eugene Springfield Oregon, makes it a good time to buy.

The latest data from the Federal Reserve Board shows a national average for fixed conventional home mortgages to be 3.35%, which is very low.  How long will it stay that way?  No one really knows, but analysts are saying rates will stay low until unemployment drops below 6.5% which they’re not expecting in 2013.  Last quarter’s GDP actually was in negative territory, attributed to a decrease in defense spending.  Get  2 of those in a row and you have a recession, by definition; analysts are not expecting that, though.  New home building is expected to contribute significantly to the economy in 2013.

If you are thinking about buying a house in Lane County, please contact me.

Monthly Mortgage Interest Rates through December 2012

Monthly Mortgage Interest Rates through December 2012